Perseids Redux

 
August 12, 2015   11-16, 15/2.8, Astronomy
 
 

Meteor shots can be taken with a wide angle lens, a tripod, and a camera set on long exposure, typically 30 seconds or more. A lot of waiting in the dark of course but with some tunes and a glass of wine sitting out under the summer stars is not a bad way to spend some time.

I first tried this two years ago, also in August, during the Perseid shower. Lucky me, on my first night out I got a decent shot of a Perseid meteor. It's the second one below. I used bulb mode on the D300 and a timer on my android along with a wired remote to control the shutter.

So this morning, just after midnight, I spent about an hour taking sky shots to see if I can better the 2013 shot. I used the 15 mm fisheye to get more sky, a little higher ISO as I'm using a newer sensor, and a 30-sec exposure. Each 30-second exposure is followed by 30 seconds of noise reduction so each shot takes a minute, half of which time the shutter is closed and of course that's when I seemed to see the most meteors falling down though maybe I was imagining them. This morning I pulled the 53 shots into Lightroom, jacked up the lightness, and found two with meteors. Not very pretty meteors, though, with jagged trails. I guess I need to keep working on my recipe.

If tonight's clear I'm going to try again, but I'll use a non-fisheye wide angle, the same 11-16 as I used before. I don't like the curved horizon I'm getting from the 15. I'll also use the D800e's interval shooting function which I've been testing.

 
Sml    Med    Big
 
 
Perseid meteor      
 
Perseid meteor      
 
Perseid meteor      
 
Perseid meteor over Port Angeles      
 
Perseid meteor over Port Angeles      
 
Perseid meteor over Port Angeles      
https://jamesgaston.ca/295